HISTORY OF BUENOS AIRES

The City of Buenos Aires had two foundations. The first in 1536 by Pedro de Mendoza (destroyed in 1541 by the inhabitants themselves as a result of the constant threats of the natives), and the second in 1580 by Juan de Garay and both times belonged to the Viceroyalty of Peru of the Spanish Empire.
The urban approach of Buenos Aires responded to the criteria of the cities of Spanish colonization of the time: a checkerboard of square apples. Starting at bourbon reforms, in 1776 Buenos Aires was designated capital of the newly created Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata.

Buenos Aires is often cataloged by many as a European city outside of Europe. And it deserves this qualification, among other reasons for its rationalist urbanism, very in line with the rationalism used in the extensions of the European cities of the XIX. 
From its origins it belonged to the Viceroyalty of Peru of the Spanish Empire. It was a city of minor importance compared to Lima and other colonial plazas.
The interests of Spain in these lands were to guarantee and support the navigation of the rivers that penetrated into the territory, ensuring the possession of the lands and contributing to their populated, thus facilitating the circulation between Upper Peru and these new domains.
Thus, circulation and commerce will be the dominant features of the early times in the City.

The urban area was amanzanado and each block divided into four lots, which were awarding the conquerors and founders of greater rank.
But the city, which was the Atlantic gate of the Spanish empire in South America, did not have a significant development until it became the capital of the Viceroyalty of the Rio de la Plata in 1776.
Beginning with the Bourbon reforms, in 1776 Buenos Aires was designated capital of the newly created Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata. This is how it began to be a city commercial of greater importance.